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>> good morning, everyone, and thank you for joining us. it is my pleasure to be here with our regional fta administrator and our commissioner from san francisco who sits on the metropolitan transportation commission. we have a new development in terms of the muni metro system, one of which is the beginning of the card installation system. we have nine stations that will be receiving newgate's. and we will be adding another 19 disabled fare gates. what we are attempting to do here is replace the infrastructure that has well tapped is useful life in terms of our fair gates, and we are cobbling that at the same time with a nuclear program, which you all should be aware of and which is the regional smart card that will be used throughout the area for public transit trips in the region. the new ticket vending machines -- we have purchased 40 of those ticket vending machines. customers should be able to go to any metro station and purchase tickets that can be used on all of the systems in the metro region. they are multi-lingual machines. they speak in english as well as spanish and
the ultimate sacrifice for us. as we transfer this treasure, this island, from the navy back to the city, i hope that all of us will remember the service and sacrifice of every sailor, every marine, living and dead. [applause] and the people who left from here and the people who serve today, risking everything, so that we can celebrate today. that legacy lives on in the young men and women who wear the cloth of this country and who are deployed around the world as we meet here today. when the famous or infamous bates 3 aligning closure process started in 1988, a final result of any individual base closure and transfer could not have hoped for a better ultimate outcome than what has been achieved in treasure island. the navy's charge is to dispose of property in a manner that promotes economic development. that has been done. the transfer of treasure island is a win for san francisco. it is a win for the state of california, a win for the united states navy, and a win for the american taxpayers who paid for this base and all the infrastructure that was here. because of this transfer, the ame
fewer cars than last year, which gives us more of an ability to protect the trees and tree roots and other things like this. the promoters have been working with us on a code of conduct that we will be actively promulgating out to the participants about driving, picnicking, to help make certain that there is full thoughtfulness on the use of the metal. and they have been wonderful about this. the permits for this are $9,000 for the facility, and last year, this was 6300. this is the final year of the three-year phasing so this will go to 9000. and there is a leap -- remediation fee, dedicated to the metal. this will go into the fund for all the things that we can do to help that metal, specifically. the park patrol may remain the same at 1950. this is because there is some discussion about having the part do more and the police to a little bit less. and at their request, the date of the cars were moved to 1980 and older, as opposed to 1972. younger people kind of -- they want to reach out to the younger people and they had vehicles that are not as old. in the event of rainfall or
have a strong and salsa-type music following. so a lot of us came down here in san francisco to joey's specifically on sunday's. so i know as far as all my companions from sacramento that we really enjoy jelly's. and we'll certainly regret it. all of us have felt safe at joey's, it advocated a clean, healthy, fun environment. i'm not aware of the details. i don't believe this is something that was due to joey's and their way of operation. i'd like to express my support for continuation of joey's. thank you. >> for public comment -- >> good morning. i'd like to speak about the waterfront land use plant study. >> this is situation is intolerable. to break up a club and put up a tower, which is against the waterfront plan use specifications that they should connect the land to the bay is crazy. they speak out of two sides of their mouth. that's called corruption. this is not about money and greed. hundreds of car garages is wrong. it's an already difficult situation we have now, so how could you approve a plan like this? it's ridiculous. all we can think of is what's behind all this. an
with the schools. hopefully, it would give us some resources. also, it gives us an opportunity to integrate into the other strategies of school improvement we are developing, so i am very supportive of this and hopefully will be following through. >> i want to make decisions i think will help as well. we're having a tendency part of the questions that are asked when it comes to any of the reporting that is happening, so they are asking questions about attendance and when parents are engaged, they are also being asked about attendance. often one student will cut five departments, and we have been working collaborative lay -- collaborative flav -- collaboratively around shared data. you have a more collaborative association. if there is the case across the board that reaches all of the departments with one person reporting, we are hoping this is going to help with that. the last point is we want to set a goal for ourselves, and we are not only looking at how we reduce truancy but how we move students who have been chronically absent and moving them to 20 days. that really makes a difference.
who uses the oil and dive into safety by the middle of 2011. we are delighted to be able to use this opportunity. back in october, we had a ground-breaking ceremony for the project as a whole. we had the speaker of the house nancy pelosi with us. the mayor was here, other dignitaries. at the time, we were looking at the oil drive -- doyle drive. we now have a different project for the 21st century. it is an example of what partnership and inventiveness and the full participation of the amazing community of san francisco residents can do to create a project that is really worthy of the amazing natural setting of the presidio park, the largest urban park in the park system. let me start by making some acknowledgements. we have some speakers who i will introduced in a moment, but i am very pleased to welcome to the event, dan representing the speaker's office. i would also like to have very much thank christine from senator feinstein's office, as well as mega miller, a field representative team for senator boxer. in that knowledge and then come i want to the knowledge and leadershi
department will be hosted the navy and marine corps for a practical search and rescue training. the u.s. navy is going to host a regional civilian prepared this volunteers and urged people from around the region -- preparedness volunteers answered by people from around the region, and a number of activities will take place from around the green. the blue angels will also be year. we did not put that on the list, but that is a given. on october 16, the san francisco fire department is having their annual citywide emergency response team drills. the list of where those are going to occur is on this. as we moved into october 16 through 18, we will be doing bourbon shield regional terrorism exercise that is an annual event -- urban shield regional terrorism exercise. the sheriff's department and police and others are heavily involved in this. it is my understanding we will have captains' available in five-hour shifts and the police department that will be helping the area command for all the exercise sites that will occur in this committee. october 21, and i would like you to go back to your agen
to give us the chance to put our risk into reality and jobs into the future of america and san francisco. i want to announce that we have been working very hard with the last week and with business leaders across america targeting 10 key states that have used this program to great success. mississippi, pennsylvania, florida, texas, michigan, and five other states, and we are starting an online campaign to petition signatures in each state, not only from the employee side, but from a business side. let us create more jobs. let us add to our payroll, payroll taxes, to help us at more to the government, but we need another leg up for another year. help us in his advocacy effort in 2010 and 2011. so, mayor newsom, thank you one more time so much. and i would like to introduce one of the faces of the people who works for me. there is a real sight to this, and it gives me great pleasure to introduce ginger, who works in archives and just celebrated her one-year anniversary with the archives. >> thanks, robert. thanks, mayor newsom. thanks, everyone, for having me here. i am a single mother, an
. and it will come out of laguna honda. all of us should be proud. all of us should be grateful that we have had a small piece of that particular history. because that history helps me bear a lot of responsibility, to be a husband, to be a father. this institution will always be part of my life. you have taught me how to be that better person. thank you very much and god bless all of you. [applause] >> we are so blessed in our elected leaders in san francisco. senator mark leno has helped us on a bill to make sure that people who need help in a community and want to stay in the community can do so. we are very proud of this new building. at the same time, we want to make sure that people who want to stay in their homes will be able to do so. and so the senator has carried a bill that will enable us, if someone has medicaid, to use those medicaid dollars to increase the number of in-home hours that person has so that we can use those federal dollars instead of hospitalization, instead of long-term care here, in the home. our goal is that the person always has the choice as to what is the best set
have done a tremendous amount of work here in the community. tell us about your background jean >> chef well, i have been working as a community activist for a long time. i first got into it after the 1991 fire in the oakland hills it was terrible. such a need for so many volunteers and so forth. so i took a position with city of oakland to assist in the rebuilding process. as a result of that i got introduced to the group of people that were working on an enterprise grant, $25 million with the clinton administration we were able to bring to the city of oakland to do economic revitalization. i went on there to do arbitration and retiring from the city. >> i remember you from the interfaith community to meet mayor we met for over a year. >> prior to his election i formed network santa fe action, group of pastors of all denominations we did good work getting him elected mayor of city of oakland. that is how i first met you and introduced me to so many hundreds and hundreds of other pastors throughout the city of oakland and bay area that lead to the work i am doing today as a result of th
it was barbara boxer that brought us over the edge. guys, this is a legitimate stimulus project. this is a legitimate shot already project that would not have taken place a year ahead of schedule. it saved the taxpayers $90 million. that was for the leadership of speaker policy and president obama. 6200 jobs will be created over the course of this project, direct and indirect. 2600 direct jobs. you're seeing the hard hats and some of those folks. not just pictures. they are here physically with us. their lives have been enhanced because of the stimulus project. it was noted $100 million or more with the tiger grant got us a year ahead of schedule. in 2013 this will be done. what an extraordinary thing. this is right around the corner. this is real time construction and real leadership. thank you, speaker policy. thank you, barbara boxer. thank you, senator feinstein. thank you to jake mgoldrick. we had regional projects related to work on celebrity -- collectively together. he helped organize a from work with the golden gate bridge district and other leaders throughout the regio
university. this is in the middle of the avenue. this moves us into the stock that would provide greater access for the residents of the park and greater safety for all of the user's including san francisco state. this would create a very important linkage that is missing in our transportation system in this side of the city. there are other advantages not only providing for stops that you can get off the new system but also the opportunities to create a landscaped front door to the city right here on 19th avenue. we also will be providing a zero to low emissions shuttle bus that will provide access from this unique and the bus stops that we are providing at the northern edge directly to the daily city parks station. this connects directly to the part. this is a very important linkage. in the interim, we will be using the same shuttle best -- shuttle bus. as was mentioned, this is a long-term project which took approximately 20 years to complete but we know the estimates that we have given you are actually conservative ones. we see this as an opportunity to create a place that is truly u
'm going to use consistent divisions between the information so we can continue to be consistent about the report on all things that happened in the office. so firstly, the alcohol mitigation fee. hopefully you all have a -- amending the administrative code to impose a fee on alcoholic beverage wholesalers and persons to distribute or sell alcoholic beverages in san francisco, and in order to recover a portion of the health cost and administration costs for spending chronic ineastbound arenas through the sobering center. that legislation was not presented to this commission for comment, but was presented to the small business commission. it went to budget committee on august 4 and was amended after a great deal of public testimony. many of our permities did show up to speak on that item. it was heard again in a special meeting yesterday in the same committee on august 9, with further public testimony and moved to the full board without recommendation, for consideration after the recess. the small business commission continues to take a position of op significance to that fee, and this
are here to wake up the u.s. senate. we are here to wake them up because if they do not do their jobs you will not have a job, and that is why we need your help and your support and your voice. and we need it loudly and clearly. let me just conclude by thanking each and every one of you. we are going to hear from business leaders that have stepped up to the plate. you are going to hear from some of your friends and colleagues that have actually gotten a chance to give jobs. i am going to ask you, "do not leave. i need you." it infuriates me. the right all these stories that talk about it all the time, but there is not one camera here. that is wrong. i appreciate the crown and the examiner here. i want all of you on the steps. i hope the steps can hold us. we are going to do a family photo. we are going to send it all over the country. no other city has done this. we are going to send it to harry reid. we are going to send it to president obama. we are going to send it back east to congress. so you are not allowed to leave until we do this. but in the interim we are going to hear from peop
into a refinery and we can use it again. they do oil changes and sell it anyway, so now they know when a ticket to a. hal>> to you have something you want to get rid of? >> why throw it away when you can reuse it? >> it can be filtered out and used for other products. >> [speaking spanish] >> it is going to be a good thing for us to take used motor oil from customers. we have a 75-gallon tank that we used and we have someone take it from here to recycle. >> so far, we have 35 people. we have collected 78 gallons, if not more. these are other locations that you can go. it is absolutely free. you just need to have the location open. you are set to go. >> we thought we wouldd< take ts weekly video out on the road. we are here at recology at the recycling center. if you ever wondered where your recyclables go, and this new mandate for composting, the new challenges and mandates around recycling, what we are trying to achieve -- it all starts right here. we just marked an important milestone in our city. i would argue important this nationn francisco has now achieved a 77% diversion rate, the highes
this item forward as a committee report. are there any items before us? >> item four will go before the committee report on august 10, 2010, and that completes our agenda. supervisor chu: thank you very much. we are adjourned. >> i work with the department of environment and we are recycling oil. thank you. we can go into a refinery and we can use it again. they do oil changes and sell it anyway, so now they know when a ticket to a. hal>> to you have something you want to get rid of? >> why throw it away when you can reuse it? >> it can be filtered out and used for other products. >> [speaking spanish] >> it is going to be a good thing for us to take used motor oil from customers. we have a 75-gallon tank that we used and we have someone take it from here to recycle. >> so far, we have 35 people. we have collected 78 gallons, if not more. these are other locations that you can go. it is absolutely free. you just need to have the location open. you are set to go. >> good afternoon. i'm the director san francisco's department of the environment. we are here today with our partners to
like this, so we encourage people to use that. clearly, that is an option along with the red cross and the other very well known traditional avenues. sf gives back is set up on our city's official website. mayor newsom: there are a number of calls -- puc has received some calls. david has received a number of calls. anything you want to add? you have a couple of centers that were access for emergency response. i know there have been some environmental questions. >> we have a really great public utilities commission. in addition to the san francisco jail and airport, we have hundreds of employees in the immediate vicinity because we operate the regional water system, so in that capacity, they were able to immediately respond. in the first hours, that was all in mutual aid since for fire support. our first concern was making sure san bruno have water. they are our wholesale water customer, and there were some problems because one of the water mains was damaged. second, we did bring water trucks into the area to thecal fire. third, all those helicopters making those drops were pouring
. people would have gotten used to her. when he felt we were taking care of he would have moved on. that was his way. instead, she was suddenly catapulted into this job in a much more difficult circumstance than anyone imagined, at a time when everybody was morning. the building was not yet finished. there were a number of challenges. but she rose to all of them. and what she has in common with john is that she wakes up and sees what is in the best interest of the residence. that is what we do this for. it is on that that every decision should be changed. she keeps that foremost in her mind. she has done a fantastic job. i am sure that in that laguna honda corner of heaven, and john is looking down very proudly at her. [applause] >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you for spending your saturday afternoon at laguna honda. at the new laguna honda. san francisco has much to be proud of. laguna honda has been providing compassionate care for san francisco hit safety net for over 150 years. we will continue this tradition for the next 150 years to come. second, the new laguna honda, as
. because i think their properties taxes are being used for the bond issues and things that get passed. >> one of things i love about the neighborhood, as much as it changes the feel of ocean avenue and the general atmosphere is the ├žsame. you have the same library and park. >> (inaudible) a little old fashion but it combines the best of little old fashion neighborhood that with indion and wine $-bar and 3 irish pubs and just a great number of mom and pop stores. >> when we have friends from out of town or across from town, we walk up the street for dinner. what we have is the best. those who have been here many years and love the city. >> the thing i like the most is the low impact housing. it's, it has a more open feel to it. and there are kids playing the street. >> i like the trees and wide open spaces i have in backyard. and i like the big circle here in (inaudible). >> there is a lot of pride of the family dwellings and maintained. i have lived in 5 neighborhoods in san francisco and in west (inaudible) i have never seen the number of people who know of their neighbors.
outlived its usefulness as a place for residents to live. it was no longer consistent with any medicare or medicaid rules. we were the only facility left in the country running open wards. we were told we would not be allowed any longer by both the federal and state authorities. it was a place where, while the care was wonderful, the building did not fit any modern earthquake standards. where privacy was insufficient to support human dignity. where people did not have a place to store their stuff. where people did not have a window to look out on. where we had to have wards that had closing doors because there was not that easy access to the outside. here we had a vibrant set of people -- residents, nurses, doctors, attendants -- but what we lacked was a space that was equal to them. with that, i hope all of you -- looking around the crowd, so many of you did to make this reality. derek parker set the vision of every room with a window. whether it is one of you who voted for this, or one of our wonderful residents who has been a volunteer here. all of you had a role in creating that fac
. every three years, the state adopts a new code. by law, we are required to use the state code, and we are given authority to amend it based on local conditions, climate, topography. we have done this many times over the years. excuse me come up to 1984, we had our own code. since that time, we have had to take state coach, and by law, we have six months to make local changes and bring them toward to have an effective date of colon with the federal code. in doing your code update every cycle, we develop a code of cycle adoption plan, schedule, and i will point out, we are always on a tight timeframe because the city only gives us six months to make changes. that might be ample time for other jurisdictions, but we have to take the code to through the various subcommittees. i know some of you attended those hearings. we then had in-house staff comment, review, analysis, we have to bring it to the full board, mayor, mandatory 30-day waits -- so we are just always on a tight time frame. of course, the code never comes out early from the state. it always comes out exactly on time or blight,
four people have been told and explode on fire. five people remain missing. they're now telling us fiber missing all the victims of been taken a possible entry and the your have been teeth of that fight. 37 homes destroyed, a conscious moderate damage estimates dot investigation continues. what investigators search i. for >> to do is the very first full day of investigation, the fed regulators cellist the they're taking it over, and not letting another agency takeover. for all the information at this point is getting from them. there seems to be more questions than answers. they're starting to understand things a little bit better as they put together the very first short pieces >> federal investigators began the long process of finding out why this happened >> this really emphasize the magnitude was occurred here. >> his giant cheung grover ground with such great force, the same dimensions of olympic swimming pool. >> since i know because the soil is is an unstable. we do not want put anyone in there to measure. >> investigators investigators thought of assault solid piece patchwo
. if that is true, i want jerry to tell us whether or not he agrees with that assessment. >> do you agree with that? >> jonathan said something that i absolutely agree with. that is the media reflects what the public wants. in my view, the media, in general, feed a voracious appetite for vengeance by an informed public. often influenced by fear, prejudice, and ignorance. i think one of the reasons criminal defense lawyers argued so poorly is people do not understand the source of crime. they want simple, quick responses to a complicated long- term solutions. you cannot fight crime by doing what the governor is doing, cutting social services and building new prisons. [applause] you do not have to be a rocket scientist to understand. all of us who have been involved in the criminal-justice system know where people who commit crimes come from. they are poor people, people of color, victims of abuse, the mentally ill, people with substance abuse problems. there are the people that fall through the cracks of society. but that is the public read what the public wants and the public is understandably afra
with a recommendation. supervisor chu: the item is before us. i believe we will need a roll call. before we do that, i want to thank supervisor alioto-pier for her leadership in bringing this item forward and bringing people together today in this room. i also want to take a minute to thank people on both sides have come here to share your experiences. it has been very educational to hear about your experiences. i want to say thank you for that. the other thing that is very interesting in this room is as i listened to testimony on both sides, i think both of you are right. i do think in terms of voluntary services and treatment programs that those are probably the most effective programs when people do want and are part of the solution and believe they have a say in their treatment. i also agree with the other side in the sense that sometimes there is a need for a bit more. there is a need for some additional help. what has been compelling to me is the testimony from ms. lacey, a professional in this industry for many years who has worked in the behavioral courts who has seen firsthand what the court
model for her students, for her colleagues and for all of us, so it's my pleasure to introduce you to ms. jennifer man. >> i'm very honored to receive this award today, and i would like to especially thank my colleague and good friend, laura garcia castro for recognizing and nominating me. i've been teaching at spring valley school -- science school for 18 years now and i feel very fortunate to be a part of a wonderful school with a great staff. we all place a high emphasis on making sure our students are aware of the importance of intelligent behaviors and critical thinking. students learn that there's a lot of things they can do to become smarter, such as asking lots of questions, being open minded, and admitting mistakes. they also know that because everyone is different, that we may not all like the same things or learn the same way which means that if one way doesn't work for us in understanding something, we might want to approach it a different way. thus, staying persistent and not giving up, as well as finding alternatives will eventually lead our students to a path of self-disco
. great to have you with us today. the news continues in washington. have a great day. >> shannon: jailed hikers. iran changing its mind again and now says it's willing to free one of three american hikers imprisoned for more than a year. but it will come at a cost. tax cuts, the top republican in the house says he will support extension of tr cuts for americans en if tax cuts for the wealthy are allowed to expire. california explosion and the investigators are combing through the rubble from the massive explosion that ripped through suburban san francisco searching for survivors and clues as to bream.ppened america's news headquarters live from the nation's capitol starts now. one day after calling off the release at the last minute, iran says it will free one of three jailed hikers from america. sarah shourd has been held y for more than aear on accusation o spyiilng. they say they will release her on bail because of health problems but it comes at a heavy price. >> the dossier of all three defendants will be sent to the court and regarding the female defendant miss shourd because she i
: thank you. members of the board? >> well, we put the stimulus money to good use here. >> i have to thank the board. if you recall, when there was first discussions regarding the economic stimulus package, you know, one of the key activities was to make sure that this money -- you know, projects identified, which we had plenty of projects that needed fudgeding. but then also the procurement process. if you recall, you made some administrative changes that helped streamline the process in terms of, one, the staff's ability to get these contracts out on the street, or the r.f.p.'s out on the street. then to get at wards back to this board and through the board of supervisors in a streamlined process. so the economic stimulus helped us through a capital stand point. but i think it helped from an administrative standpoint also. it's showing in the results in terms of how we rank nationally in terms of this funding and expenditures and things of that nature. we are in the process. we've just been informed that we will be audited in terms of our expenditures, economic stimulus funding. that's s
not having people in their peer network who use computers in their lives. >> the important thing i learned from caminos was to improve myself personally. when i first came to caminos, i didn't know anything about computers. the second thing is i have become -- i have made some great achievements as an individual in my family and in things of the world. >> it's a real issue of self-empowerment where new immigrant families are able to communicate with their families at home, able to receive news and information in their own home language, really become more and more connected with the world as well as connected even inside their local communities. >> if we value the diversity of our city and we value our diverse neighborhoods in the city, we need to ensure that they remain economically viable. equiping them and equiping residents in those areas with jobs that will enable them to stay in san francisco is critical to that. >> the important thing that i see here at caminos is it helps the low income community, it helps the women who wouldn't have this opportunity otherwise. >> the worke
is a different world, isn't it? >> we have so many micro districts and pockets of different the used within two or three blocks. answering the question for one house may not always be the same as answering that question for different house. >> give us an idea. if you get a view, it will be different -- >> shore. the value of a simple remodel verses a very fancy kitchen remodel in a house that might be worth more than a condominium. those things can matter. it can make a difference. >> we have a request from one of our viewers to make sure we talk about -- home-improvement results and building taxes. >> accessible. >> the other thing that might be brought out his people over- improved. there is a fine line. i recommend that my client or anyone talk to realtors before they start. it is a good idea to get an idea of that neighborhood, that house, and how it can be done. >> page 22 of the handout, spend an hour with the pro. talk about what the value means and how it will add value to your home, or if it will be over spending on something that maybe you can do without. >> exactly. >> it is very imp
would in courage using multiple ways to get the news to folks. >> i want to thank you again, along with staff. i take pride in being part of the commission where we were ahead of the curved to pass the greenest building code in the country, and along with that, progressive ideas will continue to push forward these ideas in a way that everyone wants to catch up the performance curve for both residential and commercial buildings will be the leading edge for energy conservation. any closing comments? >> thank you very much. the action we are requesting is that you approve the code and for them to the board of supervisors. i think that is it. >> so approved. >> public comment? >> good morning, commissioners. [inaudible] this green coat sounds wonderful but we should always -- code sounds wonderful but we should always remember in this progress of endeavor, we need justice, it needs to be clear. we need to have seminars in our neighborhoods, public hearings -- what do you call it when they get together in a big high school and are encouraged to learn more? also, we are going to proceed
go, but it is going to cost. reza sayah is on the story for us this morning. reza, good morning to you. how much does i iran want? >> reporter: $500,000, t.j. that's how much they want. this has been a bizarre process in iran, and no doubt a difficult one for sarah shourd and her family to go through, of course. initially iranian officials came out last week and said sarah shourd would be released. then they said she wouldn't be released. and now today, again, they're saying she c be released, in exchange for half a million dollars in bail money. the latest twist came today at a news conference by tehran's revolutionary court prosecutor. the prosecutor saying today that shourd's f sarah medical condition, iran is offering to release her for that ba ail money. i don't think there is any doubt that her famy is somehow going to come up with thatmoney. it is not clear at this point when that's going to happen and when she will be allowed to leave the country. as far as the other two hikers go, shane bauer and joshua fattal, the prosecutor said today they're not going anywhere, they'
of them would prepare for 32 million. but by that variable it would not matter if you use the lower 4 million, but the additional thing that concerns me is six years, up to six years that seven of our 107 are so vehicles could fall into disrepair, whereas if you purchase new ones -- i realize you don't just go down to a lot to get them, but my question is, how long does it take them to get there? >> it could take that long and longer. the design and engineering, going through the competitive process. >> i can go to that question. the contracts is negotiated for seven vehicles. there are three that we think will take a short to medium term repairs. within the first 20 months we should see those vehicles returning. the remaining four vehicles are just piles of rubble. >> what is the age of those four vehicles we are talking about? >> 17 years. >> these cars were damaged early on when they first arrived in have been sitting and cannibalized for parts. >> sorry to unravel, but it is $32 million. these vehicles, once repaired over the course of six years, will not be as good as would be a
francisco, that as human beings, we are not really comfortable with sex. some of us do not even know who we are, right? from day to day, right? you know, i mean, sex is a very complicated issue. the idea that sexual behavior and people's aberrations with it or problems with it or confusions should send them to present for life sentences. in wisconsin, they have the same thing in iowa and illinois -- actually have built prisons just for sex offenders. can you imagine? the entire prison are sex offenders, mostly young men. that is what they are. young men who are confused about their sexuality. as my son was or your son was. i'm going to continue with this, just some of the suggestions we have had. get rid of the word "officer." you have police officers -- isn't that enough? we have, like, 2 million of them. it should be social workers, correctional workers. parole workers. get rid of parole officers and probation officers all together. i call them resource centers so that when somebody comes out of jail or prison, that it would not matter if they came out of a mental hospital or and mentally
in the dollar amount that the port commission uses to award contracts and that with those thresholds that are established in the administrative code. adoption of this resolution would also streamline the contract in process, and it would make it easier for u.s. commissioners as well as sports staff in terms of reducing the number of staff reports that are before you. in fact, there is one item on your agenda today that would not be there if we had this in place, so we are asking that you approve the resolution before you that would increase the dollar threshold for construction contracts from the current level of $50,000 to $400,000 and increase the dollar threshold for $50,000 the -- for approval of professional service contracts within the limits as established by the administrative code and other the delegation of authority that is provided by the purchaser. that concludes my report. >> so move. second. >> comment on this item? any other questions? >> i would just like to make clear that the basics for the $400,000 for services is a lapse in time since 1980. it is not a code set i
officials will brief us in a couple of moments. we will go to them live. this is a look at the press conference that should begin any minute now. here is what we have learned so far. state and federal regulators have ranked the gas line that ruptured as high risk because it ran through a highly populated area we already knew one of the people who died in that blast was 44-year-old jacquelin greg who worked for the california public utilities commission. at the time of her death she was working on plans to upgrade another risky section of that same gas line 2 1/2 miles away. this new information raises several new questions of pg&e and federal regulators. we are working to get answers to those questions. we have new information tonight on the victims. investigators uncovered two more bodies in the rubble this afternoon. that brings the total number of people killed to six. nearly 60 others were injured and four are in critical condition tonight. the president sent his condolences today to the governor and we are waiting for this press conference to begin with federal regulators in san
and chief and staff, and the people who live behind us that keep us from anarchy. my name is doug mallar, private investigator of crimes against children. i have done it for 18 years. i a participated in investigations in 16 states and six trips to washington dc i have dozens of national references who lend their names and phone numbers, saying check me out. no one has ever asked -- has never had their name taken off my list. >> as you know, some of you were here when i came to years ago, and again last year. now we are tired of coming here and asking the police chief and you people to help us protect children when we have witnesses who have seen a lieutenant colonel living in san francisco at leavenworth st. skin babies alive, as well as torture 800 victims in eight states. i am giving you what i have given to d a harris today, what i have given to the u.s. attorney in san francisco today, and which i just returned from washington, d.c. last week, where we notified eric colder -- holder, care of michelle obama, what you're law enforcement here are covering up -- the torture and murders
about the program is the way it is set out allows us to treat the artworks that have the most need, the ones that our conservative have pointed out as the most vulnerable as opposed to ones that might be the most popular were the most miserable -- the most visible. >> it is an opportunity for the public to get involved with these art works located in their backyard and ultimately belong to them. >> i want to do something for the community, just giving back what the community has done for me. it is corny to say, but it is true. it really is what it is. that i would be able to see more pieces cleanup. >>" will check back in the future and see the fruits of conservation and revitalization efforts. if you would find out more or donate to the art carethe artsfartcommission.org. >> hello, i'm meg, welcome to "culture wire." for this episode, the director of cultural affairs, luis, will take you on a journey through presidio has been tet. -- presidio habitat. >> welcome to "culture wire." today i'm at the presidio trust, a treasure within san francisco, because the presidio trust is reall
>> can we use this -- i would just read the question. can you use this for a power generator? >> yes. >> that was easy. >> if you just want to do renewable energy, just with the wind energy, we ask that you make a 20% energy improvement because we are trying to get people -- we are encouraging people to save money the best way that they possibly can. and we encourage people to show inefficiency improvement and we will give you the loans for renewable energy. >> and how do you quantify this? this is 30%. you have to certify this with the city, -- >> if your uncle is a certain kind of energy auditor, it will get very technical. but if they have a certain license to conduct certain kinds of energy audits, then they will come in, and they will do the pre-audit and you will do your work. this is where the program is moving in the long term. and because some of these programs are developed in the industry, we have a list of prescriptive measures. the measures that have been proven to be the lowest-hanging fruit, we have a list of those on the web site. and you can do those prescrip
, there is no limitation note on hours, which led us to believe we could move forward on the extended hours application, and then with this recall notification, so that was the intention. and then we brought in again this request from sfpd to continue this for tw weeks on the basis that they are having a change, and the applicant was ok with that. this is behind this memo, which indicates that they met with the applicant, and they are supportive of entertainment, but not of the hours, so we can ask the applicants what they would like to do this evening based on where we are right now. >> commissioners, i am appearing with my client, mr. saeid amin, who owns the hookah, and the also owns in north beach pizza -- owns north beach pizza. he thought they would ok the after-hours but had problems with another thing. that said, what we would like to do is we would like to put a couple of things in the record, and then we would like to ask this be put over to the call of the chair so that we can get on the same page and also get the 312 notification out. commissioner alan noted a few things. i actually have a
to respect those limitations. the use of cellular phones and other devices have been prohibited at this meeting. the chair may order the removal from the hearing room of anyone using cellular phones or other electronics producing sound. in order to facilitate an orderly meeting, we ask for you to fill out the speaker card to speak on an item in the interest of moving the meeting faster. we will have one minute to speak on each item per person. if there are extenuating circumstances that can be extended, we are trying to approve all of these items today. >> an order to allow equal time, the commission and the staff will respond to any questions during public comment. that may ask questions after the public comment is closed. we are now on item number four. members of the public may address the commission on items that within the subject jurisdiction of the commission and that do not appear on the agenda. with respect to the agenda items, the opportunity will be afforded in the item is reached during the meeting. i have one person requesting public comment. >> their plan to build
-teen and teen use, which is underserved. we have developed a community partnership and are piloting a program to offer after-school program in four middle schools. the studio hopes to be able to focus our attention on how to reach, serving the public. -- attention to outreach, irving the public. >> thanks for having us. i want to thank staff members for working with us to finalize the process, and i am very happy to be here today. i am thrilled to be able to stand here to commemorate our understanding. with your approval, we represent the beloved institution. currently, we serve youth- related programs every year. many have talked for more than 20 years. we are excited to continue to offer services for the communique, and we look forward to your approval. >> is there any other public comment on this item? public comment is closed. >> i just wanted to say a word of thanks to prius but also to the friends of the art studio. i think you goes -- you both represent a new chapter. as we are debuting our model with a focus on the arts, we welcome you as an active partner, and we're grateful for all
-- information they had, that they sent this information out to help us understand that the permit plans for the deck did not list the ladder and that was posted as a garage extension. i said that was because when we went to building, i had to go back to taking pictures and they told me i could not take down the garges because they had allowed a loft lying window next door. since they improve that, i told them that had nothing to do with that. i kept bringing them pictures showing them what i would do. consequently i paid $350 for a permit. i wrote in and buys citation notice, the information that was apparently approved by this commission of regarding the supervisors' request to have them taken off because they could be dangerous because a child had hurt themselves. they had been there three times to talk to the commission about this. she was nice enough to send me the information about today's hearing. thank you. >> did you receive a notice of violation from our department? >> in the traditional inspection they had my building listed as a rooming house. i do not know why. it is not a r
very, very bleak, and it occurred to me and all of us there that if this is true, we all have to get together and come up with new sources of income instead of taxing your own revenue sources out of business entirely. thanks it. thanks. supervisor avalos: thank you. next speaker, please. >> good afternoon, supervisors. my name is james robinson. my wife and i own a small wine shop here in the city. and we talked today about the targeting of big alcohol, but i think in reality the trickle down is going to hurt everyone in the chain below, big alcohol. we talked about price sensitivity today. three cents, five cents per glass. it doesn't sound like much but the true cost will realistically be much, much higher under the current three-tier alcohol distribution system. we talked about the impact on new payroll which could lead to further job losses here in the city. and i truly believe we need to do everything we can to stimulate job creations. the end result it seems that we would be steering business away from san francisco metro area. and we've got too many empty storefronts already t
if republicans win. democrats are using ohio congressman john boehner has a critical campaign issue. >> gregg: fedel and state investigators now saying a natural gas pipeline that exploded close to san francisco was considered high risk because it ran through a highly populated area. that explosion devastating a neighbor in sant bruno killing t least four people, injuring nearly 60 others. dozens of homes leveled by the blastith many more suffering severe damage. residents now slowly being led back into their homes. >> we will be taking the residents in as groups. as we told you before, residents wille next at their home sites we are be to assisting in reestablishing and ensuring the safety of the utilities at each residence. >> claudia, what have you learned. >> reporter: for hundreds of residents whose homes were not severely damaged, they get to go home. hundreds of residtsenave gathered here at skyline community college in san bruno. they showing photo i.d. and now being escorted in shifts back into their neighborhood that was rocked by a deadly pipeline explosion. you can see the scene a
used and we have someone take it from here to recycle. >> so far, we have 35 people. we have collected 78 gallons, if not more. these are other locations that you can go. it is absolutely free. you just need to have the location open. you are set to go. >> welcome to culture wire. did you know the city of san francisco has an art collection consisting of 3500 objects? the collection ranges from painting and public buildings to murals, and from bronze busts in city halls, to cite specific structures. at this time, many of the large works are in desperate need of repair, and a long-term innovative solution is needed to make sure these public treasures will be cared for. >> the story of the arts commission program begins with ruth fromstein. 2010 marks her 50th year as an art dealer. at the helm of the county, she had represented some of the most notable of bay area artists, and continues to look for new talent. >> the artists that i represent, what do i choose them, if asked to do with a background of what the gallery is about. i love the idea of finding new guys and watching t
for every $1 spent on prevention. clearly they were acting out all litigation in san francisco, using a portion of those funds to save money in the long run. an ounce of prevention is worth 1 pound of cure. i ask you to seriously consider passing the mitigation fee, not only to deal with the costs of excessive alcohol consumption, but two events -- invest in efforts that will have a larger held down the road. supervisor avalos: -- larger help down the road. supervisor avalos: next speaker. >> we are in a tenuous position in coming out of this large recession, trying to encourage our patrons back. we have cut our prices to try to keep customers. this legislation, from the controller who i would like to thank from his insights, said that there would be a $13 million trickle-down impact on the businesses. i would like you to know that this impact will end with the loss of business and our customers. will impact my employees with a loss of shifts and jobs and possibilities of closing one or more of my location's. i would like to encourage you to vote no on this of all legislation. thank y
. and tom baker, consumer editor for ktvu channel 2 news. we'll begin with you, tom. tell us what you can about the explosion that shook all of us yesterday. >> it is a remarkable failure because it really shouldn't happen, given all of the protocols in place and all the things that happened to have such a fail-year you wonder. with such a catastrophic failure somebody punched a hole in one of these mains and caused a spark but that doesn't appear to be the case here. something failed in such a catastrophic way that the valves are maybe a mile, two miles apart so now all of this highly compressed gas which is under several hundred pounds of pressure per square inch is venting to the atmosphere. it catches on fire. it becomes a blow torch. it has to work out and while that was happening it was burning up that particular neighborhood. generally speaking, we don't know really what happened. we know there was a significant failure and generally speaking has been my experience in covering all kinds of disasters it's a chain of events rather than a single event but there is plenty going on that
of business. we are going to move to the barrier across and then there is nothing that will stop us from raising the bar in terms of sustainability. this is of the rising $150 million for this kind of weatherization. if you are wanting to switch out your light bulbs, and the next- door neighbor has a grade solar project -- has a great solar project, and you say, i want to change out my water heater, or have an electric car that is coming later this year. i have to use this down at work or the big parking garage. now you have the opportunity to do all of these things. you can do all of these things. you can learn how to apply. at the end of the day, we are not just reducing greenhouse gases but also your energy consumption. you are making a good investment in terms of reducing your market costs. finance this on the back of your property tax. so you did not have to pay this back. over the course of five or 20 years. this does not go with you. if you have your home or your industrial building, this is part of the up-front cost of weatherizing your house. the new property will have to be dis
at that and get back to us. i'm worried about if being a safety hazard. >> thank you very much. yes, we'll take a look at that and get back with the board. chairman nolan: one thing from a past meeting that i had asked staff, members, consent to do a review of the citizens advisory committee recommendations to see, you know, the -- the suggestions that they had made and whether we accepted them or rejected them or partially did so. and i want to thank ms. boomer for outstanding work as usual in preparing that for us. the outcome, as it was, we've accepted the majority of recommendations from the citizens advisory committee. always talk about how thoughtful those recommendations are. and this agency agrees. a lot of work in that. i do appreciate that. does anyone else have new or unfinished business at this point? ok. welcome, director beach. thank you. so with that -- [inaudible] >> good afternoon, mr. chairman, and members of the m.t.a. board. i would also on behalf of the m.t.a. staff like to welcome our new director, director cheryl brinkman. we look forward to working with you over the next
. >> good morning, everyone. thanks for joining us. i'm carolyn tyler. many san bruno residents will return to their homes today for the first time since thursday's tragic fire and may smell the odor of natural gas as pg&e crews work to restore service. some residents will be able to resume living in their homes. others will be able to go in and gather their belongings. people with red tag tones will have no access to their houses. officials plan to hold a briefing at 8:00 this morning, just in a couple hours. they'll explain those details and more. the san mateo county coroner has revised the death toll back to four and that is down from the seven reported last night. san bruno police hope forensic tests on skeletal remains found yesterday will determine if they belong to fire victims. authorities have also revealed that six residents are missing. search teams and cadaver dogs will resume looking today for any additional victims. now, of the six people reported missing, three are members of the bulllist family. amy holyfield talked to relatives who are frustrated and they're hurt. >> the f
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